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Animal Rights News Recap 7/21/2017

The six hens rescued from a SF slaughterhouse during DxE's first daylight open rescue are finally recovered enough to go outside, and they are loving it!

The Chicago Animal Save truly disrupted business at a slaughterhouse when they came to bear witness and consequently, the morning's delivery of innocent birds to their deaths was cancelled.

DxE Vancouver is back, and protested Costco following the recent investigation of a Costco pig supplier and the rescue of Lily from that miserable place. 

VIDEO HERE

DxE Twin Cities protested at Canterbury Park's Extreme Race Day where camels, ostriches, zebras and horses were being forced to race.

ARTICLE HERE

DxE Colorado disrupted the Colorado Renaissance Festival with a poetic message of love for all beings.

VIDEO HERE

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Animal Rights Activist Profile: Gene Maurillo

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Animal Rights Activist Profile: Gene Maurillo

What inspired you to first get involved with DxE?

I saw a film called Food Inc. and the bit of footage about animal slaughter in that movie was something I couldn’t quite shake.  I started to feel an increase in guilt around contributing to the horrible treatment of these animals.  However, the fear of not having a “proper diet” stopped me from becoming vegan as I thought I would get sick if I made the switch (social media was not full of information like it is today).  Fortunately, I had no other particular attachment to animal products.  Then around 4 years ago, after meeting a vegan online who eventually became one of my best friends in real life, I made the switch in my diet overnight.  It was only a month later, on Facebook, that I stumbled upon a DxE video of a Whole Foods action.  While watching, my hair nearly stood on end as if a message from some vibratory being was speaking to me (I know I exaggerate but it was quite a profound experience).  Then only another month later I found myself in the same Whole Foods as seen in the video that got me interested, alongside all these DxE people I had never met.  My adrenalin and anticipation as we walked towards the store to begin the action was running off the charts.  Afterwards, there was no turning back.  I knew animal liberation was going to play a significant role in my life for a long time.

What is your favorite or most accomplished moment in activism or other DxE activity? 

Among a few nominees, I think organizing my first action in January 2017 (an Earthlings demo) in downtown San Francisco for around 42 activists, propelled me to a whole new level.  Since then, I’ve organized more demos as part of an Earthlings neighborhood-by-neighborhood campaign in a city that abounds with counterculture history.  To me, animal liberation fits right into the mix. 

Are you part of any working group or unique activism in your chapter and how does this influence your activism? 

I formed and maintain the DxE San Francisco Working Group. There were many of us in the city that could not get over to Berkeley as often as we wanted given sometimes difficult transportation and timing/work issues, etc.   Our group has a wide palette to create lots of ideas and manifestations from those ideas, and it can be very exciting. I can’t wait for my retirement at the end of 2017 so I can really pull out the stops and recruit more and more activists in this city.  I also have a vision for further south of San Francisco as well and have started working with activists in San Jose too, in whom I have every confidence, in terms of taking the animal rights ball and running with it down there.  One other thing I do on a small scale (until the new year when it will be more extensive) is find activists.  And while finding them is prime, it’s especially gratifying to see them grow, to see their excitement and charged commitment to the cause and to see them develop their capacities – right up to being leaders.  I love encouraging and supporting.  Seeing someone attend their first action or do their first speak-out are among the most satisfying things about this work.

How do you stay motivated as an activist?

I use various methods - all over the map.  For one, I have a built-in work-labor ethic that my parents taught me coupled with the ensuing satisfaction from what manifested from those efforts.  There’s also meditation which is important to me as a daily practice to center, balance and remind myself that I am ok and there are more opportunities to come.  There’s observing other activists and going to DxE events/actions that inspire me.  There is on occasion, watching graphic slaughter videos to re-tune to the real-life pain our non-human animal friends go through or at least as best as we can re-tune via videos.  Also, I find slaughterhouse vigils very powerful having attended two at this point.  Plus, the Animal Rights Center in Berkeley is always offering new learning opportunities via presentations and classes on any number of things.  Lest I forget, there’s the annual Forum among the many great events DxE offers.  This year’s Forum was almost beyond description in its positive intensity and motivational aspects.  Also, going to the gym has always been a good tension release method and feeling/looking fit is self-inspiring.  And last, I love singing.  Finding a good song for my voice and recording it (whether it’s for animal rights or not) provides a real charge.  It’s amazing what a little artistic creativity can do to enliven the soul, renew the spirit and calm the waters.

What advice would you give to new activists?

Never stop.  Sometimes we can use an excuse or we let the ego state false cases or we don’t time manage well and have too many non-activist commitments, personal issues and more, all of which totally suck the life out of the work we really want to do for the animals.  From all this we create stories of lack and limitation.  But those minefields of voices and stories are not true.  Certainly sickness, tragedies, financial duress and overwhelm can occur and we absolutely must engage them but minus these dire happenings, we can’t cave to false thoughts or made-up dramas.  I mentioned above, some things I do to keep going but we’re all different and can think of many more approaches as well. 

I also ask everyone to learn from others, reach out to others as a friend and a supporter, take the time to socialize with other activists, and look for anything that you can do to help in any action or project.  Try to step out of your comfort zone even slightly.  You’ll feel great about yourself when you do and things will only get better with this new-found empowerment.  I’ve seen the shyest new activists shine, each in their own way.  Bring your known strengths or find what your strengths are as you go.  We all evolve as long as we don’t stop trying and actually doing.  Besides, the animals are begging us to help.  We must do everything we can to not step away.

Why animal liberation?

Because human and non-human animals deserve the very best in this life.  The thoughtless pain given to and the slaughter of non-human animals is a horrible crisis.  And to me, the offshoots of this in terms of what it does to humans, the environment and more, is a no-brainer, hands-down, largest issue of our time.  It’s up to us to dig deep and stay with this issue.  We can individually and collectively make a major difference.  All you have to do is to keep learning, observing, participating, and be 100% committed to ending all this unnecessary pain and misery.  I’m almost lost for words to say how important animal liberation is.  And really, why are we here on the planet in these bodies?  To scarf up resources and kill?  To complain?  To live a life of resignation? To live in the false ego?  If we hold any of these beliefs, that seems like a pretty pointless existence to me.  Let’s encourage people to become vegan and further, to become animal liberationists.  We need many, many more activists. 

In addition, let’s source who we really are (love, peace, compassion, bliss) and use these tools to make all of this happen in a way that will sustain itself.  We can’t fight with pre-vegans and we can’t fight amongst ourselves.  Elevating our consciousness is prime – yes, I said prime – in making all this happen and happen so it endures.  Actions alone won’t do it.  Elevating consciousness alone won’t do it.  We need both and must aspire to do and be with both.

Last, I say in full confidence, that we will attain the peace I speak of along with the immense number of humans we require to do it.  We will free the animals forever and thereby essentially save the planet.  Some say it will take 40 years but I’m going for a far shorter amount of time.  At 67, I’m going to say this will occur in MY lifetime.  So, let’s take this journey together and just get it done!  Thanks for reading.  Namaste (which is a cool word that means “I salute the light within you”).

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Was the DxE Forum Really Worth It?

Was the DxE Forum Really Worth It?

Calen Otto

One trip across the country. $400.  Six Days.

I have sore muscles, bruised heels and almost no voice. I sit and breathe in a café in downtown San Francisco. It’s hard to concentrate. People talk. Music plays. The city bustles. And my mind sprints in all different directions. I flash back to images of chickens being passed from a slaughter house into the arms of activists. I flash back to the sounds of hundreds of people singing in harmony, asking for peace. I flash back to feelings of excitement, worry, exhaustion and bliss. I flash back to the DxE Forum.

What is DxE?

DxE stands for Direct Action Everywhere.  We’re a group that takes actions for animals. We concentrate on amplifying the voices of non-human animals--but we protest for all animals, human and non-human.

Calen Otto jumping for joy! A.K.A., for animal liberation

Calen Otto jumping for joy! A.K.A., for animal liberation

Before this past week, I honestly wasn’t as proud to say “we” when I talked about the group. Yes, I did believe in the cause. And yes, I did consider myself to be a part of the group. I even put in my time and energy into making sure that I was doing everything I could to speak out for animals with my local chapter.

This post isn’t to explain to you what DxE is all about. Through pictures, videos, and story-telling the message is pretty clear. I’m just here to share my experience of the DxE Forum with you.

So, we get back to the question.

Was the forum really worth it?

Let me rewind and take you on a tour of the past week. On a Tuesday morning, I boarded a plane in North Carolina and made three stops before I reached Berkeley, California. It was a full day of flying, and I was exhausted and feeling a little cloudy by the time that I touched down in the Golden State.

Some DxE members of an activist house attempting to spell out "AQUA"

Some DxE members of an activist house attempting to spell out "AQUA"

That night, I went and met a group of activists who I would stay with for the next week. Everyone skipped the handshakes and went straight for the hugs.

Although there were 14 of us in a 2-bedroom house, we learned how to function together without losing our minds in the frustration and impatience that can often be so easily found. Everyone wanted to share, and I might even venture as far as to say that people were excited to share. From food, to socks, to toothbrushes, if you name it, we probably shared it.

We all piled into a car on the first morning of the Forum, and arrived, just a little late. I had missed the morning Tai Chi session, but as I checked in I was happy to feel a little recharged with the previous night’s Zs.

Calen Otto and Arwen Carlin ready to listen and learn

Calen Otto and Arwen Carlin ready to listen and learn

The schedule of the first day was an excellent example of how many of the coming days would follow. We started the days with hello’s and announcements, and then sailed right into learning about a rainbow of topics in large and small groups. We learned about how to can take action to save animals, right now. We soaked up all we could about how to practice non-violence in intense situations and everyday life. We listened and participated in example situations to better our knowledge on the subject of consent when interacting with others, and more specifically, in sexual situations.

We listened to some keynote speakers, including Wayne Hsiung, a founder of DxE, and Anita Krainc, founder of Toronto Pig Save. I watched people laugh, cry, hug, break down and be inspired while others offered their experiences. At one point, I had a break down and almost sprinted out of the room as to not disrupt others with the odd sounds of my breathing and sobs all moped together. As soon as I turned the corner, heading out the door and into fresh air, I saw another activist sobbing as well. We didn’t ask any questions, we just fit right into each other’s arms. I held this person, and they supported me until we could both speak. I swear, it was a scene right out of a movie.

DxE Forum attendees spell out "Animal Liberation Now!!!!" 

DxE Forum attendees spell out "Animal Liberation Now!!!!" 

Although I did shed an excessive amount of tears during this week, I promise, I didn’t cry the whole time. We often forget that crying doesn’t have to be separate from feelings of gratitude.  There were so many things each and everyday to be thankful for. DxE provided us with goodies for breakfast, delicious and full meals for lunch, and our sponsors sent amazing products that we got to take home with us each day. We did different group-building activities, such as yoga and spelling out “Animal Liberation Now” with our bodies, and got an awesome picture from up above!

To top it all off, we did amazing actions.

I could make this post ten times longer by story-telling about these actions, but I think it’s better if you just watch for yourself.

Charlie Sudlow and Calen Otto protesting with other DxE members in San Francisco, CA

Charlie Sudlow and Calen Otto protesting with other DxE members in San Francisco, CA

I will tell you, though, that I felt so empowered by choosing to make history and create change with hundreds of compassionate humans.

On the last day, we decided to do something that hadn’t been done before.

Activists stand outside an SF slaughterhouse during an open rescue

Activists stand outside an SF slaughterhouse during an open rescue

 Imagine this: hundreds of activist walking calmly through the city streets of San Francisco. They are all carrying white flowers.

They walk through a small alley. They perform public disobedience by doing a sit-in outside of a slaughter house right in the middle of downtown.

Some activists go inside to document conditions. More importantly, they go inside to save lives. One activist is arrested. Six birds experience freedom for the first time.

Six lives are saved.

Activists then march through the streets, protesting all the way. They land at city hall. They stand outside offering messages of concern, love and action.

Activists go inside and deliver a message of how it’s time for all animals to be considered more than property or items.

Activists march to City Hall

Activists march to City Hall

Humans get active. Humans do things that create immediate change. Humans do things that are bold. 

Activist Julianne Perry holds one of the six rescued chickens

Activist Julianne Perry holds one of the six rescued chickens

Humans do things that are necessary.

So, you tell me.

Was it worth it?

 

 

 

Edited by Michael Amaní

 

Want to see more of what happened at the Forum?

VIDEO HERE

 

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Animal Rights News Recap 7/14/17

DxE activists in Wisconsin disrupted a performance by Circus World during the elephant act to speak out against the exploitation.

ARTICLE HERE

A family of animal rights activists in Florida saved a fish who had been caught and left on the sidewalk to die by throwing them back in the water, and got major coverage of the event.

ARTICLE AND VIDEO HERE

DxE Phoenix disrupted a Chick-Fil-A on "Cow Appreciation Day" with signs reading "Eat Mor Plantz" to highlight the speciesism in eating chickens to show appreciation for cows.

VIDEO HERE

Activists with DxE Toronto were detained after disrupting a bullfighting event in hopes of getting the cruel event banned.

ARTICLE AND VIDEO HERE

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

 

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Rescued Animal Profile: Vendetta

Rescued Animal Profile: Vendetta

What was your life like before your rescue?

For years, all I knew was solitary confinement. Humans have bred bettas to fight each other for sport, so I cannot share space with other males. Even though humans are the ones who did this to my species, we are the ones who suffer the consequences.

My ancestors lived in Asian rice paddies, but I have lived most of my life in one small container or another. When I was shipped from the breeding facility to the pet store, my captors kept me in a tiny plastic bag containing barely enough water to keep me alive. I thought that nothing could be worse than that, but I was wrong.

My life was valued at $4.99.

My life was valued at $4.99.

I was given a box to call my home. Two inches by two inches by two inches was all I ever got to see of the world. They brushed off my enslavement by half-assed references to our domestication, forgetting that they are the ones who made us suffer like this.

My only interactions with other fishes were glances into adjoining boxes. Everyone I saw looked too depressed to move. Sometimes my neighbors died, and it would take the store owners days to notice because none of us swam around much in the first place. I wondered how my captors would feel if they were forced to stay right next to their dead and dying friends.

What’s your liberation story?

One day, everything changed. Two humans came into the store and picked up my box. At first I thought they were just another pair of greedy customers, come to shake me around and then put me back on that lonely shelf. But they were gentle with me, and instead of taking me to be purchased like I’d seen everyone endure before, they took me right out of the store, right out of my hell.

They put me in a larger box, and even though it was only about three times bigger than the previous one, it was the biggest place I’d ever lived. I was overjoyed to be out of the store, but I was also overwhelmed with my new surroundings and anticipation of what would come next. I was exhausted.

What is your life like now?

My new home, complete with real betta leaves and moss balls!

My new home, complete with real betta leaves and moss balls!

The day after my liberation, my new family put me in a twenty gallon tank. I didn’t know what to do with myself! I swam lap after lap after lap of the tank. The moment they put the heater in was the moment I was sure that these people really loved me--not because they could make money off of me, but because they just loved me as a person.

I had always been cold in the pet store, because we weren’t given heaters in our boxes--even though to keep bettas healthy we should be kept in 80 degree water. My new heater wasn’t the only amazing improvement though! My parents also installed a water pump, a filter, a light, gravel, some plants, a hammock, and a castle for me to hide in.

I was rescued six months ago, and even though these have been the happiest months of my life, it hasn’t always been easy. I keep getting all sorts of illnesses, and the medicine available right now is adequate at best. My family is doing the best that they can, but they live in a world that would rather flush fishes down the toilet than spend any money on research for our diseases.

I have been making friends! A few months ago, my dad ordered some live plants to add to my home, and there were snails on them! The snails have since reproduced and multiplied, so now I can never complain about being lonely!

One of my snail friends and me

One of my snail friends and me

How has your companionship impacted your new family?

Both of my parents had been outspoken about speciesism before my rescue, but I think living with me has made them especially passionate about addressing anti-fish speciesism. Humans don’t bond as easily with fishes as they do with mammals or even birds, and so most of the time our struggles are ignored, even within animal advocacy.

Recently, my parents have been learning a lot about the microsanctuary movement, and have decided that they want to create the first fish microsanctuary. Soon my tank will be one of at least four tanks, all home to fishes experiencing freedom.

Why animal liberation?

Because nobody deserves to be kept in a box, and everyone deserves the taste of freedom.

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

 

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Animal Rights Activist Profile: Hogan Ganschow

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Animal Rights Activist Profile: Hogan Ganschow

Animal Rights Activist Profile: Hogan Ganschow

Q: What inspired you to first get involved with activism and/or to join DxE?

In the first few months I was vegan, I remember watching the news and seeing Black Lives Matter protesters blocking the SF Bay Bridge, and I understood that that type of bold, nonviolent activism was meant to demonstrate the urgency of the problem, and force a discussion with those that have historically refused to negotiate in good faith.

When I made the ethical connection to animals in the Summer of 2015, I almost immediately realized that being vegan wasn’t enough, but I didn’t have any community around me. Searching for community, I found DxE by reconnecting on Facebook with the first vegan I ever met during a college summer abroad trip fifteen years earlier. He was sharing DxE disruption videos and he even had one that he captioned with something like, “Good on them. We could all be doing more for animals.” And I thought, “that’s right! I can be doing more.” So I contacted DxE and I asked them about starting my own chapter, and Priya Sawhney (SF Bay), Connie Pearson (Inland Empire), and Aidan Cook (Colorado) called me and gave me a great support and advice. And I just did my first forum, and now I am blocking traffic!

Q: What is your favorite or most accomplished moment in activism or other DxE activity?

This is a tie between two actions at this year’s forum. I loved being a part of the Ferry Building die-in protest during this year’s DxE forum when we all rose from the ground and started chanting “Animal Liberation NOW!” in unison. The power in our unified voice filled the building, and it really made me feel like the animal rights movement has arrived.

The last day’s open rescue was memorable because I was consulted on the legal risks beforehand and as a result the activists felt comfortable following through. Even though I only acted as a legal consultant and police liaison, to see it be such a success under the circumstances was very gratifying.

Q: Are you a part of any working groups or unique activism in your chapter and how do they influence your activism?

My career is as a public defender, so I am part of the legal working group with some amazing people that I am proud to call friends. DxE legal work helps me start to think how we can use open rescue and activism to catalyze a shift in legal norms, and how I might play a role in that in the future. I also get to hear about certain actions before they happen when I am consulted about the legal risks, so I have the opportunity to hopefully provide peace of mind to activists who are worried about what could happen if they get arrested and/or prosecuted. When I hear about or see an action go off as planned, or I hear about someone getting a good result in a legal case I helped out on, it makes me feel good even if I only played a small role, and gives me confidence that I can embody with the SB chapter so they feel comfortable doing actions as well.

As for my own chapter, we are just getting off the ground, but I love doing Cube of Truth demos with other local activists, because the responses from bystanders are always so positive and people really do make honest commitments to going vegan right on the spot.

Q: How do you stay motivated as an activist?

By remembering that activism is genuinely fun! Sometimes it can feel like there isn’t enough time for everything or it’s too scary, but watching what other chapters are doing motivates me and keeps me in check. We all help support each other and hold each other accountable. Like anyone who has discovered DxE, I remind myself of how bad the animals have it and it’s very hard to be complacent. When I see what amazing actions other activists are doing, it inspires me to see if I can do something just as bold and creative.

Q: What advice would you give to new activists?

Go to a Save Movement vigil. They are an amazing opportunity to do activism. It seems scary to be that close to suffering, but you come away from the experience with new information and a better ability to start conversations and relate a personal story. It is a genuine moment of modest comfort for the animals. And in between trucks, you have the opportunity to talk to other vegan activists about incredibly meaningful topics. And meat-eaters are sometimes there and ready to make the switch if the right person is there to listen to them and counsel them.

Q: Why Animal Liberation?

It has been said that “the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.” This is not merely a nice poetic metaphor, but an expression of a force of nature, as real as the force of gravity, with human and nonhuman animal liberation as the pot of gold at the end of that arc. It is not a coincidence that the same issue that is most likely to give someone a heart attack or cancer is also the leading cause of environmental destruction and climate change. The fact that something so simple on its face--treating animals with fairness, compassion, and justice--has the power to unlock an amazing paradigm shift in individual and collective consciousness and health, reveals something deep about the nature of life, the destiny of our and other species, and the future of everything.

Right now in 2017, humans are just beginning to design ways of actually visiting other planets and star systems. If we do not achieve animal liberation, we will either go extinct before we can get off the ground, or we will begin to spread a very violent, hateful, and wasteful cancer across the cosmos. In my worst nightmares, I sometimes imagine whole planets filled with factory farms. This is the eternal battle of life and death, but on a universal scale, and we are at a crucial tipping point. Animal liberation is that important, and we must succeed. We will succeed.

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on social media. 
  2. Join a local DxE community 
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in building a true social movement for animals.

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No Matter What It Takes

No Matter What It Takes

Why I will never stop doing Open Rescues, no matter how many times they charge me for it

Diane Gandee Sorbi, DxE Open Rescue Investigator

The stench hits you long before you arrive at the facility. We know we are headed for a place of misery. Suddenly, off to the side, we spot a horrifying scene: the body of a mother pig, casually draped over the side of a dumpster. A once living being, with interests and desires of her own, treated as mere garbage. There was no burial for this individual. To the industry she was nothing more than a product. An object. A thing. This is one of the reasons I participate in open rescue. The stories of these brutalized animals need to be told.

Open rescue work is challenging and can be traumatizing, as I was once again reminded while investigating Circle Four Farms in Utah, a massive pig farm which supplies to Costco. Trudging through deep snow at 3AM when it’s 18 degrees isn’t pleasant. Tension runs high, as when my teammate and I were doing lookout, and twice a vehicle pulled up behind ours, flashing their lights into the car for several minutes. Fortunately, the anticipated knock on the window never materialized. In a society such as ours, where some laws are profoundly unjust, there is a lot at stake. I have already accrued multiple charges for simply trying to save an innocent life.

Some may question whether it is worth it. Why risk incarceration, why travel across the country to face unimaginable horrors, if we are only able to help a few animals at a time? For me, it is because each one of those lives is precious and valuable. Countless lives have already been needlessly lost. We are opening a window so that others may view the harsh reality of their commodification. One day we will look back on our exploitation of animals with disgust and shame. Until that day, I will continue to fight for their right to be free. Because the moment one of those lovely beings who was formerly imprisoned in the hell known as animal agriculture takes their first step of freedom, I know it was all worth it.

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Animal Rights News Recap 7/7/2017

DxE activists were arrested for disrupting the annual Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest in New York City, and they got widespread coverage in the media.

ARTICLE AND VIDEO HERE

Also in NYC, activists protested at City Hall on behalf of the horses forced to pull carriages through the city.

VIDEO HERE

The New York Times covered DxE's latest investigation and open rescue of a piglet named Lily from a cruel Smithfield farm called in Milford, Utah.

ARTICLE

PETA protesters dressed as orca whales "beached" themselves at SeaWorld to protest the captivity and violence at SeaWorld.

ARTICLE

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on social media. 
  2. Join a local DxE community (or, better yet, come visit us in Berkeley).
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in building a true social movement for animals.

 

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Animal Rights Activist Profile: That Vegan Activist Family

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Animal Rights Activist Profile: That Vegan Activist Family

Animal Rights Activist Profile: That Vegan Activist Family

Mike, Kayla, Landon & Rilee-Paige Leaming

Q: What inspired you to first get involved with activism and/or join DxE?

Mike: What inspired me to join DxE was a speech by Wayne about social change. That speech motivated me to start doing disruptions.

Kayla: I was inspired to be an activist when I learned about the horrible treatment of all animals. I was inspired to be a part of DxE when I watched the amount of passion and bravery it takes to go out there and speak up for the animals, even when it's hard. I immediately wanted to be a part of this movement!

Landon: Smash HLS inspired me to be an activist. We yelled alot there and I loved it! Then we went to DxE and it was so awesome! Now I help organize the Orlando chapter.

Rilee-Paige: The first time I went to DxE Pinellas, I wanted to do more.

Q: What is your favorite or most accomplished moment in activism or other DxE activity?

Mike: My most accomplished moment as an activist was seeing my kids have the courage to speak out at the FWC meeting against bear hunting, in a room full of 250 hunters. With their courage and all the other activists, we were able to stop bear hunting for 2 years in Florida.

Kayla: My biggest accomplishment as an animal rights activist is all the animals I have been able to save with my family. Being able to see an animal go from sick and dying to happy and healthy is an amzing exprience, and that is what gives me the courage to go and speak out in front of crowds of people.

Landon: Saving all the lives we have is what I'm most proud of. We've saved 2 pigs, 8 chickens, 1 guinea pig, and 1 dog!

Rilee-Paige: My favorite part of activism, was saving our pit bull, Lexi, from the pound.

Q: Are you a part of any working groups or unique activism in your chapter and how do they influence your activism?

Group: Were currently not part of a working group, but we have talked about starting a family working group! We are trying to bring kids and families together, and hopefully inspire the younger generation to fight for animal rights!  We would love to one day open a family activist house in Berkeley!

Q: How do you stay motivated as an activist?

Mike: Every time I bear witness to a slaughter truck or an animal in need, it makes me want to save more of them, and shut these industries down.

Kayla: The motivation is everywhere. There are so many animals in need all around me that motivate me to help them. The passion of other activists motivates me, and knowing that every second of every day animals are dying makes me want to do everything that I can to help them!

Landon: When I go to these dairy and egg farms, I want to make it stop. And all the other abuse happening to animals makes me want to save more lives.

Rilee-Paige: Saving lives makes me want to save more lives, and DxE events make me want to do more DxE events!

Q: What advice would you give to new activists?

Mike: Everybody gets nervous and scared, it's what you do with that fear that makes a difference.

Kayla: Don't worry, you're going to do great! I was super nervous at my first action, I still get nervous, but as soon as it starts that goes away. When it's over, you're going to want to do another one!

Landon: Everyone is nervous their first time, you're not the only one! It is ok because we support you.

Rilee-Paige: I've done a bunch of protests and they've all been good! I was nervous on my first one, but now I want to do it again and again.

Q: Why animal liberation?

Mike: Without animal liberation there will never be human liberation. It is the single biggest injustice in the world.

Kayla: I speak out for animals, because animal abuse is the most normalized violence in the world. These animals are amazing individuals and they deserve a life with their families, free from harm. Thousands of animals are dying every second world wide, and I feel like its my moral obligation to do everything I can to save them. I love them too much not to fight for them

Landon: The animals are being treated so cruel and they're living in really bad enviroments. It's just horrible.

Rilee-Paige: Animal liberation because every animal needs our help. Every single animal is dying.

Q: Tell us about your recent rescue of two hens outside of a slaughterhouse.

Group: On July 3, 2017 Organizers from Okeechobee Animal Save, Orlando Animal Save, DxE Orlando, and DxE Pinellas, along with many volunteers, got together for Tampa Animal Save's first Vigil. It was a very successful vigil, and a day full of emotions. We were at Musa Slaughterhouse, in Tampa Fl. When we fist got there we witnessed goats, young and old, being held in a filthy holding pen, along with pigeons, chickens, sheep, and cows. Somehow during the protest, 4 Hens and 1 Rooster made it out of the holding pen, and into the parking lot. We all sat outside the fence trying to get the chickens to come out of the fence to safety. We spent 3 hours in the sun, trying to get these terrified chickens to trust us. They kept running out of the fence, but as soon as we got close to them, they would run back inside. Eventually, we were able to rescue our first girl and took her to safety! She was dehydrated and hungry. Her first snack was a banana and she LOVED it, so we named her Nana! About 20 minutes later, our second girl was liberated. The DxE pinellas organizer, named her Nydia because it means safe place. They are now living a life, free from harm at a sanctuary!

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on social media. 
  2. Join a local DxE community (or, better yet, come visit us in Berkeley).
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in building a true social movement for animals.

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Animal Rights News Recap 6/30/2017

The six hens rescued from a San Francisco slaughterhouse during the first DxE daylight Open Rescue are recovering well from their severe health issues.

During its screenings of Okja, a movie theater company has decided to offer an all-vegetarian menu, which shows, despite the presence of cow's milk on the menu, that the movie has gotten people thinking about the violence involved in eating animals.

ARTICLE HERE

The Animal Agriculture Alliance listed Direct Action Everywhere as one of the seven biggest threats to animal agriculture.

LINK HERE

DxE has a new chapter in North Dakota!

A PETA supporter protested a barbecue festival by dangling from a "meat hook" in between two pig "carcasses," reminding attendees that eating an animal means eating a corpse.

peta protest

ARTICLE HERE

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on social media. 
  2. Join a local DxE community (or, better yet, come visit us in Berkeley).
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in building a true social movement for animals.

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