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Animal Rights News Recap 8/11/2017

DxE activists in Missouri protested horse carriages because horses are individuals, not tools.

VIDEO HERE

Lily's rescue story was brought to Germany when DxE Berlin's first action successfully revealed the truth about what happens to pigs in animal agriculture.

VIDEO HERE

Mexico City just became the first city in Mexico to ban dolphin shows!

A Colombian court granted a writ of habeas corpus to a bear named Chucho, who was then freed from his imprisonment at a zoo and taken to a sanctuary.

ARTICLE HERE

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Lauren Gazzola on What the Animal Rights Movement Means - AR2017 Keynote

Lauren Gazzola has seen it all. From working at a historic civil rights organization to facing unprecedented political charges as a SHAC7 defendant, Lauren has experienced all the ups and downs of working as a social justice activist. 

And at this year's animal rights conference, she had a message for our movement: we have to get to the core of what our movement means. From unpacking human supremacy to understanding the power of protest, this is one of the best talks you will ever hear. We are consistently inspired by Lauren Gazzola's words, and we think you will be, too. Check it out, and let us know what you think! 

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Robert Grillo Calls For “Truth-Centered Advocacy”

Robert Grillo Calls For “Truth-Centered Advocacy”

By Leslie Goldberg

When Donald Trump tweets insults, lies and inanities, he is actually, whether he knows it or not, taking a page from animal agriculture and its defenders, says animal rights writer and activist Robert Grillo. “It’s called the tactics of deflection,” he explained, speaking on the phone recently from Chicago where he lives. 

Grillo is out with a new book, titled “Farm to Fable – The Fictions of Our Animal-Consuming Culture.” The author will be giving a talk at the Berkeley Animal Rights Center, 2425 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA, on Friday, Aug. 11 at 7 pm. He will discuss, among other things, how animal rights activists might counter industry’s (and Trump’s!) relentless pursuit of changing the subject.

According to Grillo, animal agriculture wants to talk about anything except the torture and killing of animals.  Some diversions include statements such as “Plants have feelings too”; “Why don’t you care about people?”; “Vegans are wimps and weird”; “Everybody’s nutritional needs are different”; “I only eat ‘humanely-raised’ animals or animals I killed myself”; “Vegans are angry and rude”; and “Animals give their lives to us.”

These are some of the fictions our animal food-eating society is built on and it’s up to activists to call out these things for what they are: fabrications. 

Unfortuately, activists can fall victim to this same deflection tactic spawned by animal ag, says Grillo. We do this when we focus on simply changing the behavior of the non-vegan rather than really getting to the core of the problem: human exploitation of animals. When we stop short of talking about values such as truth, honor, non-violence, respect, kindness, and empathy for all, we fail to reach people at the deepest levels – the levels where true and lasting change occurs.

“For example, like handing out [vegan] food samples to the exclusion of dealing with the messier, more difficult issues,” Grillo said. “To me, it’s like treating the symptoms rather than the cause of the disease.”

In his book, Grillo expresses frustration with this corporate style of activism embraced by the large main-stream non-profit animal rights organizations, which ask for little from members beyond donations and/or small changes in behavior. “They are asking us to adopt a ‘foot in the door’ tactic, believing that small changes can lead to large fundamental change.

“There is no basis or research to show that this is effective,” Grillo said. In his book he points to the huge amount of recidivism among people trying to go vegan.

The author notes that this corporate style non-profit advocacy is unique in history.  It was never used in the civil rights movement, the women’s movement, the gay rights movement or the anti-war movement. Like Direct Action Everywhere, Grillo takes guidance from these non-violent social justice issues.

Direct Action Everywhere’s “Liberation Pledge,” which asks participants to decline to sit with people eating animals and to also explain why we’re not sitting with them, is a prime example of the kind of activism Grillo supports.

The author writes that whenever we activists avoid honest discussion and focus on “acceptance” instead of “influence,” we are engaged in the “tactics of deflection” ourselves, which is not to say he’s in favor of aggressively shouting down or insulting a naysayer or refusing to hear them out. 

“We need a ‘truth-centered advocacy’ which establishes trust and integrity with our audience,” he said. “We don’t need to use deception. Fully 80 percent of Americans care about the suffering of animals, according to one study. We must appeal to peoples’ higher values.”

Grillo suggests advocates adhere to three core truths in our work on the behalf of animals:

1) Stick to the truth of the experience  (as we can best understand it) of the animal victims. 

2) Rely on our own true experience as witnesses to the animals.

3) Facilitate true empathy to ourselves, other humans and to animals. Help others to see our commonality with non-human animals.

Robert Grillo has 20-plus years of experience in marketing, publishing and writing. He is the director and founder of the non-profit animal advocacy group “Free From Harm.” The 700-page Free From Harm website is accessed by www.freefromharm.org

 

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Animal Rights News Recap 8/4/2017

In the SF Bay chapter, the design team organized their first protest, a visually striking demonstration which showed pigs in a powerful light.

VIDEO HERE

Activists disrupted SeaWorld Aquatica in Orlando, "beaching" themselves on the shore to speak out against the imprisonment of orcas and other animals.

VIDEO HERE

After being protested regularly by DxE activists, a Berkeley butcher shop has posted a sign in their window admitting that killing animals is wrong, no matter how it is done.

VIDEO HERE

ARTICLE HERE

Activists in Los Angeles gathered to bear witness and offer water as a truck brought pigs to slaughter, and the following article was published sharing the experience through pictures.

ARTICLE HERE

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Animal Rights Activist Profile: AJ Jivdaya

ANIMAL RIGHTS ACTIVIST PROFILE: AJ JIVDAYA

Q: What inspired you to first get involved with activism and to join DxE?

The credit would probably mostly have to go to my friend Rayne Pearson, a DxE activist in Seattle. My entry into activism was in fact with DxE, and it came with much initial hesitation.

I was mostly the passive kind of vegan for about a year after initially going vegan, and I fully deserve all the criticism I may get for that. One day I made my first ever animal rights related post on Facebook, and Rayne noticed it. I was only Facebook friends with Rayne at that point and we'd never talked before, in person or otherwise. The spirit of the post was such that Rayne felt I should be invited to join DxE Seattle's next action. When she reached out, I expressed to her that I have seen videos of DxE actions before, and that I don't think I could or want to participate in something like that. Nevertheless, for subsequent actions, she continued to ask me if I would like to join. After I believe about a month I finally agreed to at least come and observe the next action in person, but not actually participate. So I did just that. And this made all the difference in my perception of these actions. It is a completely different experience watching the action on video, than it is watching it in-person, where you also actually engage with the activists before and after the action, and feel their energy during the action. Today, whenever I have someone express similar hesitation to me, I recommend them to at least just come and observe as I did, even if they don't yet feel comfortable participating. I am extremely glad and grateful that Rayne was persistent with me. Since that day, I've been participating in pretty much every action that's taken place in my area, whether it be Seattle, LA, or Inland Empire.

Simultaneously with beginning to participate in DxE, as a new activist I was also heavily involved in the No New Animal Lab anti-vivisection campaign that was being waged against the University of Washington and Skanska, the construction company building the new torture facility for UW. Having gone vegan, I had been under the impression that I was "awake", and I was making a big difference. But after getting involved in these two groups in my first days of activism, I truly realized what was at stake, and felt truly awoken. I had a new sense of direction about what I must do to be as effective as I can be for nonhuman beings. It was clear to me that while veganism may be nice, it is not nearly enough. The determination, the dedication, the passion of activists in either group was so infectious that I couldn't imagine myself ever NOT doing activism.

 

 

Q: What is your favorite or most accomplished moment in activism or other DxE activity?

This is a tough one. Maybe it was when two Seattle activists and friends locked themselves to a crane at the construction sight of the new UW vivisection lab, shutting down their work for a whole day. Maybe it was when we had two different groups of customers clap in support of us during an in-store disruption. Perhaps it was the time I ended up doing a spontaneous, unplanned speakout during a non-typical disruption in Seattle, not realizing I had it in me, and it actually came out surprisingly coherent. Or perhaps it was the generous and copious praise I got for my voice and delivery of a speakout in a disruption video for my first action as a new Inland Empire activist. Or seeing the attendance to the DxE Forum more than double to 320 in just one year – that's monumental! Or seeing a record number of people attend the most recent Day of Action in both the the LA and IE chapter!! I don't know, there are many amazing moments!

Q: Are you a part of any working groups or unique activism in your chapter and how do they influence your activism?

LA and IE chapters are both still relatively small. Both chapters have attempted to reach out to the community to get working groups going, but haven't had much success so far. But both chapters are growing and we'll get there one day!

Q: How do you stay motivated as an activist?

This will probably definitely sound cliché, but honestly, I really just keep our goal of animal liberation in the forefront of my mind. So far I haven't needed anything else. As I said in a previous answer, it is something I cannot imagine ever NOT doing, because the matter is just that urgent. Another way that helps is seeing activism take place in so many different places in the world, in so many different forms, for so many animal rights issues. And COMMUNITY is also an important factor, especially when one is facing any kind of trauma or burnout.

 

 

Q: What advice would you give to new activists?

Please try ALL styles of activism, Try each one available in your local area and community at least once before forming opinions, judgements, or criticisms of any one style. General protests, disruptions, street marches, slaughterhouse vigils, video outreach, leafletting, college campus tabling, vegfest tabling, open rescue, sticker activism...the list is endless. When you do need to voice criticism, do so with enough humility to realize that we don't really truly know how negatively or positively something effects the movement in the long-run. But please do something and definitely make activism a priority in some way, shape, or form. Take breaks, but never stop going. It is extremely crucial that you do.

You will no doubt be exposed to all sorts of different conflicts, which I believe can be more intense in the activism community than the non-activism vegan community. Please avoid knee-jerk reactions overreactions. Try to look at the bigger picture. Try not to let any single incident paint a black-and-white picture of any one activist, group, or organization, especially when the details are unclear, ambiguous, or unsubstantiated. Role models are great to have, but avoid idolizing.

Q: Why Animal Liberation?

Nonhuman beings are probably THE most innocent, THE most vulnerable group of individuals on this planet. Yet they are the ones subjected to the most brutal and violent kind of treatment at our hands. We bring them into this world by the dozens of billions each year just to cut off their heads after a short life of torturous confinement. Animal liberation because this is the unimaginable reality we are in and it's frightening and it needs to end. Animal liberation because to set a goal for anything less is undermining their individuality and their personhood. Animal liberation because we must and we will.

 

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take.

Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on social media.
Join a local DxE community
Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in building a true social movement for animals.

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Animal Rights News Recap 7/28/2017

DxE St. Louis got press for their disruption of a pig roast at a local restaurant, getting the message out that there is no such thing as "humane meat."

ARTICLE HERE

DxE Toronto and Toronto Save Movement joined together and took to the streets to speak out against the exploitation of backyard chickens.

VIDEO HERE

Also in Toronto, a slaughterhouse vigil was covered in the news showing the urgency of this issue.

VIDEO HERE

DxE Twin Cities held their first Earthlings Experience, where they invited the public to view clips of the film and had meaningful conversations with many.

 

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Animal Rights News Recap 7/21/2017

The six hens rescued from a SF slaughterhouse during DxE's first daylight open rescue are finally recovered enough to go outside, and they are loving it!

The Chicago Animal Save truly disrupted business at a slaughterhouse when they came to bear witness and consequently, the morning's delivery of innocent birds to their deaths was cancelled.

DxE Vancouver is back, and protested Costco following the recent investigation of a Costco pig supplier and the rescue of Lily from that miserable place. 

VIDEO HERE

DxE Twin Cities protested at Canterbury Park's Extreme Race Day where camels, ostriches, zebras and horses were being forced to race.

ARTICLE HERE

DxE Colorado disrupted the Colorado Renaissance Festival with a poetic message of love for all beings.

VIDEO HERE

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Animal Rights Activist Profile: Gene Maurillo

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Animal Rights Activist Profile: Gene Maurillo

What inspired you to first get involved with DxE?

I saw a film called Food Inc. and the bit of footage about animal slaughter in that movie was something I couldn’t quite shake.  I started to feel an increase in guilt around contributing to the horrible treatment of these animals.  However, the fear of not having a “proper diet” stopped me from becoming vegan as I thought I would get sick if I made the switch (social media was not full of information like it is today).  Fortunately, I had no other particular attachment to animal products.  Then around 4 years ago, after meeting a vegan online who eventually became one of my best friends in real life, I made the switch in my diet overnight.  It was only a month later, on Facebook, that I stumbled upon a DxE video of a Whole Foods action.  While watching, my hair nearly stood on end as if a message from some vibratory being was speaking to me (I know I exaggerate but it was quite a profound experience).  Then only another month later I found myself in the same Whole Foods as seen in the video that got me interested, alongside all these DxE people I had never met.  My adrenalin and anticipation as we walked towards the store to begin the action was running off the charts.  Afterwards, there was no turning back.  I knew animal liberation was going to play a significant role in my life for a long time.

What is your favorite or most accomplished moment in activism or other DxE activity? 

Among a few nominees, I think organizing my first action in January 2017 (an Earthlings demo) in downtown San Francisco for around 42 activists, propelled me to a whole new level.  Since then, I’ve organized more demos as part of an Earthlings neighborhood-by-neighborhood campaign in a city that abounds with counterculture history.  To me, animal liberation fits right into the mix. 

Are you part of any working group or unique activism in your chapter and how does this influence your activism? 

I formed and maintain the DxE San Francisco Working Group. There were many of us in the city that could not get over to Berkeley as often as we wanted given sometimes difficult transportation and timing/work issues, etc.   Our group has a wide palette to create lots of ideas and manifestations from those ideas, and it can be very exciting. I can’t wait for my retirement at the end of 2017 so I can really pull out the stops and recruit more and more activists in this city.  I also have a vision for further south of San Francisco as well and have started working with activists in San Jose too, in whom I have every confidence, in terms of taking the animal rights ball and running with it down there.  One other thing I do on a small scale (until the new year when it will be more extensive) is find activists.  And while finding them is prime, it’s especially gratifying to see them grow, to see their excitement and charged commitment to the cause and to see them develop their capacities – right up to being leaders.  I love encouraging and supporting.  Seeing someone attend their first action or do their first speak-out are among the most satisfying things about this work.

How do you stay motivated as an activist?

I use various methods - all over the map.  For one, I have a built-in work-labor ethic that my parents taught me coupled with the ensuing satisfaction from what manifested from those efforts.  There’s also meditation which is important to me as a daily practice to center, balance and remind myself that I am ok and there are more opportunities to come.  There’s observing other activists and going to DxE events/actions that inspire me.  There is on occasion, watching graphic slaughter videos to re-tune to the real-life pain our non-human animal friends go through or at least as best as we can re-tune via videos.  Also, I find slaughterhouse vigils very powerful having attended two at this point.  Plus, the Animal Rights Center in Berkeley is always offering new learning opportunities via presentations and classes on any number of things.  Lest I forget, there’s the annual Forum among the many great events DxE offers.  This year’s Forum was almost beyond description in its positive intensity and motivational aspects.  Also, going to the gym has always been a good tension release method and feeling/looking fit is self-inspiring.  And last, I love singing.  Finding a good song for my voice and recording it (whether it’s for animal rights or not) provides a real charge.  It’s amazing what a little artistic creativity can do to enliven the soul, renew the spirit and calm the waters.

What advice would you give to new activists?

Never stop.  Sometimes we can use an excuse or we let the ego state false cases or we don’t time manage well and have too many non-activist commitments, personal issues and more, all of which totally suck the life out of the work we really want to do for the animals.  From all this we create stories of lack and limitation.  But those minefields of voices and stories are not true.  Certainly sickness, tragedies, financial duress and overwhelm can occur and we absolutely must engage them but minus these dire happenings, we can’t cave to false thoughts or made-up dramas.  I mentioned above, some things I do to keep going but we’re all different and can think of many more approaches as well. 

I also ask everyone to learn from others, reach out to others as a friend and a supporter, take the time to socialize with other activists, and look for anything that you can do to help in any action or project.  Try to step out of your comfort zone even slightly.  You’ll feel great about yourself when you do and things will only get better with this new-found empowerment.  I’ve seen the shyest new activists shine, each in their own way.  Bring your known strengths or find what your strengths are as you go.  We all evolve as long as we don’t stop trying and actually doing.  Besides, the animals are begging us to help.  We must do everything we can to not step away.

Why animal liberation?

Because human and non-human animals deserve the very best in this life.  The thoughtless pain given to and the slaughter of non-human animals is a horrible crisis.  And to me, the offshoots of this in terms of what it does to humans, the environment and more, is a no-brainer, hands-down, largest issue of our time.  It’s up to us to dig deep and stay with this issue.  We can individually and collectively make a major difference.  All you have to do is to keep learning, observing, participating, and be 100% committed to ending all this unnecessary pain and misery.  I’m almost lost for words to say how important animal liberation is.  And really, why are we here on the planet in these bodies?  To scarf up resources and kill?  To complain?  To live a life of resignation? To live in the false ego?  If we hold any of these beliefs, that seems like a pretty pointless existence to me.  Let’s encourage people to become vegan and further, to become animal liberationists.  We need many, many more activists. 

In addition, let’s source who we really are (love, peace, compassion, bliss) and use these tools to make all of this happen in a way that will sustain itself.  We can’t fight with pre-vegans and we can’t fight amongst ourselves.  Elevating our consciousness is prime – yes, I said prime – in making all this happen and happen so it endures.  Actions alone won’t do it.  Elevating consciousness alone won’t do it.  We need both and must aspire to do and be with both.

Last, I say in full confidence, that we will attain the peace I speak of along with the immense number of humans we require to do it.  We will free the animals forever and thereby essentially save the planet.  Some say it will take 40 years but I’m going for a far shorter amount of time.  At 67, I’m going to say this will occur in MY lifetime.  So, let’s take this journey together and just get it done!  Thanks for reading.  Namaste (which is a cool word that means “I salute the light within you”).

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Was the DxE Forum Really Worth It?

Was the DxE Forum Really Worth It?

Calen Otto

One trip across the country. $400.  Six Days.

I have sore muscles, bruised heels and almost no voice. I sit and breathe in a café in downtown San Francisco. It’s hard to concentrate. People talk. Music plays. The city bustles. And my mind sprints in all different directions. I flash back to images of chickens being passed from a slaughter house into the arms of activists. I flash back to the sounds of hundreds of people singing in harmony, asking for peace. I flash back to feelings of excitement, worry, exhaustion and bliss. I flash back to the DxE Forum.

What is DxE?

DxE stands for Direct Action Everywhere.  We’re a group that takes actions for animals. We concentrate on amplifying the voices of non-human animals--but we protest for all animals, human and non-human.

Calen Otto jumping for joy! A.K.A., for animal liberation

Calen Otto jumping for joy! A.K.A., for animal liberation

Before this past week, I honestly wasn’t as proud to say “we” when I talked about the group. Yes, I did believe in the cause. And yes, I did consider myself to be a part of the group. I even put in my time and energy into making sure that I was doing everything I could to speak out for animals with my local chapter.

This post isn’t to explain to you what DxE is all about. Through pictures, videos, and story-telling the message is pretty clear. I’m just here to share my experience of the DxE Forum with you.

So, we get back to the question.

Was the forum really worth it?

Let me rewind and take you on a tour of the past week. On a Tuesday morning, I boarded a plane in North Carolina and made three stops before I reached Berkeley, California. It was a full day of flying, and I was exhausted and feeling a little cloudy by the time that I touched down in the Golden State.

Some DxE members of an activist house attempting to spell out "AQUA"

Some DxE members of an activist house attempting to spell out "AQUA"

That night, I went and met a group of activists who I would stay with for the next week. Everyone skipped the handshakes and went straight for the hugs.

Although there were 14 of us in a 2-bedroom house, we learned how to function together without losing our minds in the frustration and impatience that can often be so easily found. Everyone wanted to share, and I might even venture as far as to say that people were excited to share. From food, to socks, to toothbrushes, if you name it, we probably shared it.

We all piled into a car on the first morning of the Forum, and arrived, just a little late. I had missed the morning Tai Chi session, but as I checked in I was happy to feel a little recharged with the previous night’s Zs.

Calen Otto and Arwen Carlin ready to listen and learn

Calen Otto and Arwen Carlin ready to listen and learn

The schedule of the first day was an excellent example of how many of the coming days would follow. We started the days with hello’s and announcements, and then sailed right into learning about a rainbow of topics in large and small groups. We learned about how to can take action to save animals, right now. We soaked up all we could about how to practice non-violence in intense situations and everyday life. We listened and participated in example situations to better our knowledge on the subject of consent when interacting with others, and more specifically, in sexual situations.

We listened to some keynote speakers, including Wayne Hsiung, a founder of DxE, and Anita Krainc, founder of Toronto Pig Save. I watched people laugh, cry, hug, break down and be inspired while others offered their experiences. At one point, I had a break down and almost sprinted out of the room as to not disrupt others with the odd sounds of my breathing and sobs all moped together. As soon as I turned the corner, heading out the door and into fresh air, I saw another activist sobbing as well. We didn’t ask any questions, we just fit right into each other’s arms. I held this person, and they supported me until we could both speak. I swear, it was a scene right out of a movie.

DxE Forum attendees spell out "Animal Liberation Now!!!!" 

DxE Forum attendees spell out "Animal Liberation Now!!!!" 

Although I did shed an excessive amount of tears during this week, I promise, I didn’t cry the whole time. We often forget that crying doesn’t have to be separate from feelings of gratitude.  There were so many things each and everyday to be thankful for. DxE provided us with goodies for breakfast, delicious and full meals for lunch, and our sponsors sent amazing products that we got to take home with us each day. We did different group-building activities, such as yoga and spelling out “Animal Liberation Now” with our bodies, and got an awesome picture from up above!

To top it all off, we did amazing actions.

I could make this post ten times longer by story-telling about these actions, but I think it’s better if you just watch for yourself.

Charlie Sudlow and Calen Otto protesting with other DxE members in San Francisco, CA

Charlie Sudlow and Calen Otto protesting with other DxE members in San Francisco, CA

I will tell you, though, that I felt so empowered by choosing to make history and create change with hundreds of compassionate humans.

On the last day, we decided to do something that hadn’t been done before.

Activists stand outside an SF slaughterhouse during an open rescue

Activists stand outside an SF slaughterhouse during an open rescue

 Imagine this: hundreds of activist walking calmly through the city streets of San Francisco. They are all carrying white flowers.

They walk through a small alley. They perform public disobedience by doing a sit-in outside of a slaughter house right in the middle of downtown.

Some activists go inside to document conditions. More importantly, they go inside to save lives. One activist is arrested. Six birds experience freedom for the first time.

Six lives are saved.

Activists then march through the streets, protesting all the way. They land at city hall. They stand outside offering messages of concern, love and action.

Activists go inside and deliver a message of how it’s time for all animals to be considered more than property or items.

Activists march to City Hall

Activists march to City Hall

Humans get active. Humans do things that create immediate change. Humans do things that are bold. 

Activist Julianne Perry holds one of the six rescued chickens

Activist Julianne Perry holds one of the six rescued chickens

Humans do things that are necessary.

So, you tell me.

Was it worth it?

 

 

 

Edited by Michael Amaní

 

Want to see more of what happened at the Forum?

VIDEO HERE

 

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

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Animal Rights News Recap 7/14/17

DxE activists in Wisconsin disrupted a performance by Circus World during the elephant act to speak out against the exploitation.

ARTICLE HERE

A family of animal rights activists in Florida saved a fish who had been caught and left on the sidewalk to die by throwing them back in the water, and got major coverage of the event.

ARTICLE AND VIDEO HERE

DxE Phoenix disrupted a Chick-Fil-A on "Cow Appreciation Day" with signs reading "Eat Mor Plantz" to highlight the speciesism in eating chickens to show appreciation for cows.

VIDEO HERE

Activists with DxE Toronto were detained after disrupting a bullfighting event in hopes of getting the cruel event banned.

ARTICLE AND VIDEO HERE

Want to get involved? DxE is a grassroots network focused on empowering you to be the best activist you can be. Here are some steps you can take. 

  1. Sign up to our mailing list and share our content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 
  2. Join a local DxE community --or start your own!
  3. Take the Liberation Pledge. And join us in creataing a true social justice movement for animals.

 

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