NEWS OF THE WEEK:

Big Ag Attacks ‘Test Tube Burger,’ Animal Abusers Must Register, Feb. 20, 2018 – Feb. 26, 2018

By Leslie Goldberg

  Lab-grown burger.

Lab-grown burger.

DON’T CALL IT ‘MEAT’ SAYS BIG AG

Edgy about the prospect of “clean meat” or meat grown in labs from a few cells from actual cows, the U.S. Cattleman’s Association is petitioning the USDA to not allow this food to be called “meat.” They want to exclude “products not derived directly from animals raised and slaughtered.” Apparently, an animal must be tortured and murdered to taste right. “There’s just something inherently wrong (sic) about a test tube burger,” wrote Amanda Radke of Beef Magazine. “Where will the flavor come from?” (Beef Magazine, Feb. 18, 2018)

ANIMAL ABUSERS MUST REGISTER

The state of Tennessee is now requiring those convicted of animal abuse to register in much the same way sexual abuse offenders are. The Tennessee law is, perhaps, inspired by counties in New York as well as Cook County in Illinois. The law aims to alert law enforcement and the public to individuals who might be prone to commit violence against humans. A New York legislator, Jon Cooper, claimed that “Almost every serial killer starts out by torturing animals, so in a strange sense we could end up protecting the lives of people.” Maybe. But studies have shown that about 40 percent of serial killers torture animals. And certainly not every animal abuser turns into a serial killer. Still these measures may help non-human animals. (Lad Bible, Feb. 18, 2018)

BUT WHAT ABOUT COWS, PIGS AND CHICKENS?

A legislative bill in Iowa aims to impose harsher penalties on those convicted of abusing a dog or a cat. Proposed by state senator Brad Zaud, the law would not cover farmed animals or wild animals. He said he wanted to reassure farmers: “Most agricultural workers are doing a terrific job taking care of the livestock.” Yes, and I have a bridge I would like to sell you. (KCCI DES MOINES, Feb. 2, 2018)

A BLOW TO THE INDONESIAN DOG AND CAT MEAT TRADE

The Indonesian city of Tomohon has just pledged to ban the killing of dogs and cats for food. This ban is thanks to the work of Change for Animals, Dog Meat Free Indonesia Coalition and Animal Friends Manado. This is a major breakthrough for animal rights in that country as Tomohon is considered a dog and cat meat trade hub, where tens of thousands of dogs and cats are killed for their flesh. (Live Kindly, Feb. 19, 2018)

THANK YOU DENMARK!

Denmark will stage its first animal rights march ever this spring. Staged by the Danish Vegan Society and Vegan Change, it will take place March 31, 2018 in Copenhagen and Aarhus. The activists hope to be joined by vegan friends in Great Britain, Germany, Switzerland and any other country. (Plant Based News, Feb. 22, 2018)

THE USDA RESPONDS TO SLAUGHTERHOUSE ANIMAL CRUELTY (SORT OF)

The USDA has cited an Oregon slaughterhouse for animal cruelty when a federal inspector saw a worker cut the throat of a fully conscious pig as she hung upside down. The citation was given on Feb. 6. A USDA animal cruelty citation given in a slaughterhouse means very little. The federal inspector can stop the line temporarily and tell workers to fix the problem. A PETA spokesman said, “(We) are asking the Oregon Department of Agriculture to investigate and to file criminal charges appropriate against Masami Foods and those responsible in the hopes of preventing more animals from suffering the same mishandling.” Last November this slaughterhouse was accused of animal cruelty when a worker shot a cow three times in the head. The Klamath County Sheriff reviewed reports and decided no crime had been committed. (KTVL, Feb. 20, 2018)

VEGAN YOGURT TAINTED WITH COW’S MILK

A “vegan” yogurt was recalled in the U.K. because, well, it wasn’t vegan. Traces of cows’ milk were found in Co Yo brand yogurt, forcing stores to remove the product from their shelves. Apparently one of the company’s suppliers blew it. A Co Yo statement said they were “devastated” by the mishap, adding that “being dairy-free sits at the heart of everything we do.” Co Yo sold in the United States is fine. So far, no injuries or illnesses have been reported. (Washington Post, Feb. 20, 2018)